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Registro de autoridad

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association

  • ppcli
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1917-

During the First World War veterans of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) in Ottawa began to gather informally. The Patricia Club of Ottawa was formed 27 December 1917. Other Patricia Clubs were later formed in some of the larger Canadian cities. These clubs provided personal assistance to veterans and their families as well as other public services. Following the Second World War, on 18 May 1946, Hamilton Gault organized the first meeting of the PPCLI Association. On 13 September 1953, the PPCLI Association was incorporated. It was structured with autonomous Branches in Canadian cities or regions, and one Branch in the United Kingdom. From 1953 to 1994, the Association ran the PPCLI Regimental Museum and Archives. In 1964 the Association established the Hamilton Gault Memorial Fund for charitable purposes. From about 1982 to about 1994 the Regimental Adjutant was also Secretary-Treasurer of the Association. As of 2017, there were 10 Branches of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association across Canada.

Petrie, Charles A.

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • 1925-

Born 22 April 1925 in Edmonton Alberta, TM12658 Charles Petrie enrolled in the Canadian Army as a private 7 June 1944. He was selected for Airborne training but was remustered to the General Reinforcement corps in November 1944. After further training in England he qualified as an Infantry Signaller and was transferred to the Calgary Highlanders at Rodenkirchen, Germany in May 1945 as a clerk of Headquarters Battalion in the Occupation Force. By the end of June 1945 Private Petrie was back in England and returned to Canada shortly thereafter. He was released from the Canadian Army 2 October 1945 and returned to the University of Alberta in Edmonton. After graduating with a BSc in 1948 he worked as a calculator on seismic surveys and then as an oilfield chemist. He enrolled as an officer candidate with the Loyal Edmonton Regiment and was commissioned 1 January 1950. He then enlisted with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 23 October 1950 and was posted to 2nd Battalion at Camp Wainwright, eventually becoming assigned to the 3rd Battalion, C Company, 9 Platoon 30 November 1950. In March 1951 he was transferred back to the 2nd Battalion and was assigned to 5 Platoon on the eve of the Battle of KapYong, 24 April 1951. In June he served as the Quartermaster and then as Platoon Commander 8 Platoon, C Company until the Second Battalion was relieved by the First Battalion in November 1951. He remained in Korea as Admin Logistics Officer until December 1951. Returning to Canada, he served with the 2nd Battalion as Intelligence Officer, Assistant Adjutant and Platoon Commander both in Canada and Germany until December 1956. He then spent 5 years at Headquarters, Saskatchewan Area where he was promoted to Captain and then assigned to Tactical Headquarters in Newfoundland from 1961 to 1963. From 1963 until his release from the military 24 July 1970 Captain Petrie held several staff appointments in Ottawa. Following his military service he returned to university and eventually became a teacher and silversmith. He was living in Victoria, BC in the 1990s and in England in 2014. «

Petrie, Charles A.

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • 1925-

Born 22 April 1925 in Edmonton Alberta, TM12658 Charles Petrie enrolled in the Canadian Army as a private 7 June 1944. He was selected for Airborne training but was remustered to the General Reinforcement corps in November 1944. After further training in England he qualified as an Infantry Signaller and was transferred to the Calgary Highlanders at Rodenkirchen, Germany in May 1945 as a clerk of Headquarters Battalion in the Occupation Force. By the end of June 1945 Private Petrie was back in England and returned to Canada shortly thereafter. He was released from the Canadian Army 2 October 1945 and returned to the University of Alberta in Edmonton. After graduating with a BSc in 1948 he worked as a calculator on seismic surveys and then as an oilfield chemist. He enrolled as an officer candidate with the Loyal Edmonton Regiment and was commissioned 1 January 1950. He then enlisted with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 23 October 1950 and was posted to 2nd Battalion at Camp Wainwright, eventually becoming assigned to the 3rd Battalion, C Company, 9 Platoon 30 November 1950. In March 1951 he was transferred back to the 2nd Battalion and was assigned to 5 Platoon on the eve of the Battle of KapYong, 24 April 1951. In June he served as the Quartermaster and then as Platoon Commander 8 Platoon, C Company until the Second Battalion was relieved by the First Battalion in November 1951. He remained in Korea as Admin Logistics Officer until December 1951. Returning to Canada, he served with the 2nd Battalion as Intelligence Officer, Assistant Adjutant and Platoon Commander both in Canada and Germany until December 1956. He then spent 5 years at Headquarters, Saskatchewan Area where he was promoted to Captain and then assigned to Tactical Headquarters in Newfoundland from 1961 to 1963. From 1963 until his release from the military 24 July 1970 Captain Petrie held several staff appointments in Ottawa. Following his military service he returned to university and eventually became a teacher and silversmith. He was living in Victoria, BC in the 1990s and in England in 2014.

Skelly, George Alfred

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • 1929-

TH9438 George Alfred Skelly was born on 25 May, 1929. He married his wife Shirley Mary in 1950, and was living in Winnipeg, Manitoba at that time. He joined Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) and was a Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion in January 1951. He joined the 2nd Battalion in Korea as a transport officer in March 1951, and was present at the battle of KapYong. He completed his rotation in Korea with the 1st Battalion in March 1952, was promoted to Captain and served in the Canadian Army until 1956. He then undertook studies in medicine, specializing in urology, and practiced as a doctor in Britt, Minnesota, USA and Sun City West, part of metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, USA, where he was still living in 2019. He had at least two children, Diane Laurel and Vera.

Gardner, Owen Wallace

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • 1907-1991

Owen Wallace "Bill" Gardner, 1907-1991, was born in Godalming, Surrey, England. He emigrated to Canada and joined Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) as a drummer boy in 1923 at the age of 16. Rapidly promoted up the ranks, he was a Warrant Officer II and Regimental Sergeant-Major (RSM) by 1939. In 1942-1945 he served in the Instructional Cadre of the Canadian Army, and in 1945-1955 he was again an RSM of PPCLI. He saw action in North West Europe and Korea, and was the founding curator of the PPCLI Museum in 1953. In 1955 he had the rare distinction of being commissioned and appointed Captain without being required to take qualifying courses. He retired from the army in 1958. He was known as a fierce disciplinarian, but he was also a connoisseur of literature and classical music. He was married to the former Ella Bowers of Winnipeg and had one daughter, Shirley Olave McLeod. Following Ella's death in 1967 he became a close friend of the Calgary bookseller Evelyn de Mille.

Copp, Ernest Charles

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • fl. 1949-2009

Ernest Charles Copp joined the Canadian Army ca. 1949. He trained at Camp Borden, Ontario. He joined Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) and trained to be a paratrooper at Camp Shilo, Manitoba. At the outset of the Korean War, the original battalion of PPCLI was designated the 1st Battalion. It rotated into the war zone from November 1951 to October 1952, relieving the 2nd Battalion and preceding the 3rd Battalion. Pte Copp was in a platoon of Pioneers, a trade which specialized in building engineering works and dismantling ordnance. By tradition, they were the only Infantry soldiers permitted to grow beards. After the war, Ernie Copp was a member of the Vancouver Island Branch of the PPCLI Association and the Korea Veterans Association of Canada. He was living in Langford, BC as of 2009.

Patrician

  • ppcli
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1933-

The Patrician is the yearbook of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). The Esquimalt Patrician was initially a quarterly magazine published in 1933 by B Company of the Regiment, then located at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, BC. In January 1937 it was renamed The Patrician and in August 1938 production was moved to the regimental Home Station in Winnipeg. In August 1939 publication was suspended due to the outbreak of the Second World War. The publication was revived as a semi-annual published by the Regimental Depot in 1953, and in 1960 it became an annual. In 1968 the Patrician became one of the responsibilities of the Regimental Adjutant, and in 1973 Regimental Headquarters (RHQ) was established to centralize his functions. In 1976 the office of Regimental Major was created to command RHQ.

Erdmann, Joe

  • ppcli
  • Persona
  • fl. 1995-1996

Joe Erdmann of Bloomington, Minnesota, USA, was a hobbyist active in organizing reenactments of First World War battles. He was a leading member of the Great War Association (G.W.A.) of battle reenactors. He published a newsletter for its members, The Ric-A-Dam-Doo.

Canadian Siberian Expeditionary Force. 260th Battalion

  • ppcli
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1918-1919

The 260th Battalion was one of two Infantry Battalions within the 16th Canadian Infantry Brigade, Canadian Siberian Expeditionary Force (C.S.E.F.), formed by Order of Council 12 August 1918. They were part of an Allied Force of more than 120,000 men commanded by General Kikuzo Otani of Japan. The Allied Force was originally united to protect Allied war materials stockpiled in Russia and to reopen the Eastern Front. This priority later changed to that of rescuing the Czechoslovakian Legion, which was stranded in Siberia by the aftermath of the Russian Revolution. The Russian Revolution of 1917 necessitated the withdrawal of the Tsar's Army from the Eastern Front. This increased pressure on the already exhausted Allies in the West and put military stores at Archangel in the North and Vladivostok in the South at risk. The Czech Brigade, formed by patriotic deserters from the Austro-Hungarian Army, was no longer able to fight from Russian soil. Following the signing of the Brest- Livotsk Treaty between the Bolsheviks and the Central Powers in March 1918, the Czech Legion, now 60,000 strong and composed of pardoned POWs, displaced Serbs, Italians, Rumanians and Poles, found themselves essentially behind enemy lines. With the Provisional Government's blessing, the Legion's initial aim was to cross Siberia by rail to Vladivostok where they would sail to North America and then to France to resume the fight for an independent homeland. Following an incident involving the Czechs and repatriated Hungarian prisoners, the Bolsheviks decreed that any armed Legionnaire found along the railway would be shot on the spot. The Legion was reluctantly drawn into the Russian Civil War and forced to side with the "White" Russians. By late summer 1918 they controlled the Trans-Siberian Railway from Omsk to Vladivostok. This prompted the Allies to consider a possible Bolshevik defeat. The Canadian Government, hoping to establish favorable post-war trading opportunities with the Far East, agreed to be part of a "Mixed Brigade" to support the "White" Russians. This was the first independent military expedition that Canada was to undertake. The Armistice of 11 November 1918 clouded the issues. The Canadian people were reluctant to become involved in further offensive operations, especially in the East. This meant that the C.S.E.F. would serve only as a "stabilizing element". The 260th Battalion was composed of 42 Officers and 984 Other Ranks, 520 of which were drafted under the Military Service Act of 1917. Under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Jamieson of Edmonton, the Battalion trained at Willows Camp in Victoria from October through December 1918. The Spanish flu epidemic of 1918/19 landed 180 men in hospital and delayed departure. The Battalion finally embarked on the SS Protesliaus at Gordon Head on 26 December 1918, arriving in Vladivostok 15 January 1919. The Battalion was stationed at Gournestai Barracks (10 miles east of Vladivostok), with guards posted at East and Second River Barracks. During the 14 weeks in theatre no shots were fired in anger and, except for small parties of railway guards, the Battalion never moved east. A month after the arrival of the C.S.E.F., plans were underway to bring them home. Many of the men of the 260th were among the first to leave, departing Vladivostok on the SS Monteagle 22 April 1919. When they arrived in Vancouver on the 22nd of June, the wharf that 6 months ago was packed with a cheering populace was now deserted. In 1997 the PPCLI agreed to perpetuate the 260th Battalion and become the official "safekeeper" of the Battalion's heritage. Perpetuation is a uniquely Canadian system that insures, when possible, the deeds and sacrifices of disbanded combat units that have gained an honour or distinction in the field are remembered. The PPCLI will now carry the Battle Honour "Siberia 1918-1919".

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