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Notice d'autorité

Operation Deliverance

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1992-1993

The Canadian Airborne Regiment was established in 1968. It was organized into units of paratroopers from the three Canadian permanent infantry regiments. 2 Commando (2 Cdo) consisted mostly of members of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). On 4 September, 1992 the Canadian Airborne was tasked with participating in a peacekeeping and humanitarian effort known as Operation Deliverance in Somalia, which was suffering from a famine as well as a civil war leading to the breakdown of all political authority. 2 Commando was assigned to take a vanguard role in the Canadian Airborne Regiment Brigade Group. In December 1992 the Brigade Group arrived in Somalia, and was tasked with securing the airfield, and restoring civil order in the town of Belet Uen. It did succeed in securing the airfield, providing security and coordination for non-government organization humanitarian efforts, re-establishing the local police force, and convening meetings of tribal leaders with the objective of re-establishing a local civilian government. These achievements were overshadowed in the Canadian public view by an unfortunate incident. One of the problems the Brigade Group encountered was the theft of their supplies by youths from the town. On 16 March, 1993, one such youth, Shidane Arone, was arrested, tortured, and killed by a security patrol. The Canadian Airborne returned to Canada by 26 July, 1993. Two of Arone's captors and their immediate commanding officer were court-martialled and sentenced to prison terms and dismissal from the Canadian Armed Forces in March-April 1994. Media reports suggested that 2 Commando was permeated with members of racist organizations. The Canadian Airborne Regiment was disbanded on 1 September 1995. 2 Commando was re-integrated into the PPCLI as the Princess Patricia's Parachute Company in a ceremony on 25 September 1995.

Canada. Armed Forces. Canadian Airborne Regiment.

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1968-1995

The Canadian Airborne Regiment was established in 1968. It was organized into units of paratroopers from the three Canadian permanent infantry regiments. It was disbanded on 1 September 1995.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1953-

Soon after its repatriation to Canada in 1919, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) began to maintain a collection of its important artifacts and pictures in the custody of its Commanding Officer. In September 1953, the PPCLI Regimental Museum was established at Camp Wainwright, Alberta, and its official opening was on 13 May, 1954. The Museum's principal functions then were to preserve the traditions and history of the Regiment and contribute to the education of recruits. On 13 September 1953 the PPCLI Association was incorporated and took over the governance of the Museum. The Association, which was legally empowered to accept charitable donations, held the collection in trust for the Regiment and the people of Canada. The Regimental Adjutant acted as Curator of the Museum, assisted by serving members of the Regiment and volunteers from the Association. The Museum's operations were financially supported by the Hamilton Gault Memorial Fund, which was established by the Association. From Wainwright , the Museum followed the Regimental Home Station to Edmonton in 1957 and eventually to Currie Barracks in Calgary in 1968. In 1989 the Museum joined forces with three other regimental museums to form the Museum of the Regiments (later named The Military Museums) at 4520 Crowchild Trail SW in Calgary. In 1994 legal ownership of the collections was transferred to the Regiment. From 1996 to 2006 the Museum and Archives was managed by a civilian curator/archivist; subsequently, it was managed by a serving member of the Regiment appointed by the Regimental Adjutant.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Regimental Guard

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1977-

The Regimental Guard of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) was established in the fall of 1977, as a result of the development of a new regimental Constitution by the Regimental Executive Committee. The Guard held its first meeting on December 10, 1977. It consisted of senior officers, serving or retired, of the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel or higher, and a representative of the PPCLI Association. Its functions were to formulate the policies of the Regiment, develop and review long-range planning, and initiate special projects. It generally meets semi-annually.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Regimental Senate

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1977-2000

The Regimental Senate of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) was established as part of the 1977 revision of the regimental constitution. It consisted of PPCLI officers, active and retired, of the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and higher; representatives of the PPCLI Association; and distinguished persons nominated by the Regimental Guard or the Regimental Senate. It was expected to meet at least annually, but was not required to record minutes. Its role was to provide advice to the Colonel of the Regiment. There is no evidence that the Senate ever actually met, and it became essentially an honorary body. It ceased to be active after 1986 but a nominal roll of its members was compiled at least as recently as 2000.

Fort MacLeod photo studio

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • fl.1952-1957

Fort MacLeod, located in the town of Hemer, North Rhine-Westphalia, West Germany, was a base for Canadian infantry forces in Europe from 1953 to 1970. It was named after the historic Fort Macleod in Alberta. It was the home of the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (2PPCLI) from 1953 to 1955 and of the 1st Battalion (1PPCLI) from 1955 to 1957. During that time, a German photo studio documented the PPCLI's parades, mess dinners, family parties, and visits of distinguished guests. Photos of these events were compiled into albums, which were presented to the battalions. A numbering system made it possible for individual members of PPCLI to order photos for their personal collections. The name of the photo studio or of the individual photographer has not been identified.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. 2nd Battalion. Battle Group (Croatia)

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1992-1993

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 2nd Battalion Battle Group (2PPCLI BG) was formed from several units of the Canadian Army with 2PPCLI at its core, for the purpose of acting as a peacekeeping force in the new Republic of Croatia following the collapse of the government of Yugoslavia. It was part of the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR).

Patrician

  • ppcli
  • Collectivité
  • 1933-

The Patrician is the yearbook of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). The Esquimalt Patrician was initially a quarterly magazine published in 1933 by B Company of the Regiment, then located at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, BC. In January 1937 it was renamed The Patrician and in August 1938 production was moved to the regimental Home Station in Winnipeg. In August 1939 publication was suspended due to the outbreak of the Second World War. The publication was revived as a semi-annual published by the Regimental Depot in 1953, and in 1960 it became an annual. In 1968 the Patrician became one of the responsibilities of the Regimental Adjutant, and in 1973 Regimental Headquarters (RHQ) was established to centralize his functions. In 1976 the office of Regimental Major was created to command RHQ.

Stangowitz, Al

  • ppcli
  • Personne
  • 1931-2012

Born 13 February 1931 at Macklin, Saskatchewan, John "Al" Stangowitz worked as an apprentice welder in Edmonton before joining the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) in February 1948. He completed Recruit Basic Training at Camp Borden in Ontario and was posted to B Company, 1st Battalion, PPCLI at Currie Barracks in Calgary, Alberta in May 1948. He was trained as a bren gunner and then sent to Rivers, Manitoba where he completed his jump course (parachute training) in May 1950. Private Stangowitz was reposted to the 1st Battalion in 1950 and then returned to Camp Borden where he completed the Driver Operator and Signals course. When he returned to the Battalion in July 1950, he was employed as a Signaller and passed the Air-Portability course in August. Stangowitz then was sent to Wainwright, Alberta to help train the Second Battalion, Signals for service in Korea. He was sent to Korea, arriving in September 1951, and was attached to B Company, 2nd Battalion, PPCLI. Al was wounded by a shell fragment to the head in April 1951 and evacuated to Japan where he spent three months recovering. He was then transferred to Movement Control at Iwakuni, Japan where he was employed loading priority supplies onto aircraft. When the 2nd Battalion was relieved by the 1st in October 1951, Private Stangowitz returned to Canada and applied for discharge in November. Following the War he worked as a carpenter for forty years. He was active in the PPCLI Association, the Korea Veterans Association and the Royal Canadian Legion, and volunteered at the PPCLI Regimental Museum. He was married to Dorothy Stangowitz (d. 2006) and to Doris Stangowitz. He had four children, James, Gordon, Brenda, and Douglas. He died in Calgary on 13 September 2012.

Petrie, Charles A.

  • ppcli
  • Personne
  • 1925-

Born 22 April 1925 in Edmonton Alberta, TM12658 Charles Petrie enrolled in the Canadian Army as a private 7 June 1944. He was selected for Airborne training but was remustered to the General Reinforcement corps in November 1944. After further training in England he qualified as an Infantry Signaller and was transferred to the Calgary Highlanders at Rodenkirchen, Germany in May 1945 as a clerk of Headquarters Battalion in the Occupation Force. By the end of June 1945 Private Petrie was back in England and returned to Canada shortly thereafter. He was released from the Canadian Army 2 October 1945 and returned to the University of Alberta in Edmonton. After graduating with a BSc in 1948 he worked as a calculator on seismic surveys and then as an oilfield chemist. He enrolled as an officer candidate with the Loyal Edmonton Regiment and was commissioned 1 January 1950. He then enlisted with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 23 October 1950 and was posted to 2nd Battalion at Camp Wainwright, eventually becoming assigned to the 3rd Battalion, C Company, 9 Platoon 30 November 1950. In March 1951 he was transferred back to the 2nd Battalion and was assigned to 5 Platoon on the eve of the Battle of KapYong, 24 April 1951. In June he served as the Quartermaster and then as Platoon Commander 8 Platoon, C Company until the Second Battalion was relieved by the First Battalion in November 1951. He remained in Korea as Admin Logistics Officer until December 1951. Returning to Canada, he served with the 2nd Battalion as Intelligence Officer, Assistant Adjutant and Platoon Commander both in Canada and Germany until December 1956. He then spent 5 years at Headquarters, Saskatchewan Area where he was promoted to Captain and then assigned to Tactical Headquarters in Newfoundland from 1961 to 1963. From 1963 until his release from the military 24 July 1970 Captain Petrie held several staff appointments in Ottawa. Following his military service he returned to university and eventually became a teacher and silversmith. He was living in Victoria, BC in the 1990s and in England in 2014. «

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