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Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. 3rd Battalion

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1950-

The 3rd Battalion of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, also known as 3PPCLI, 3 PPCLI, 3VP, and 3 VP, was formed 30 November 1950 as part of the Special Force raised for active service in Korea. The Battalion trained in Wainwright, Camp Borden and Ipperwash, Ontario. It provided reinforcements for both the 1st and 2nd Battalions during their tours in Korea before relieving the 1st Battalion in Korea 11 November 1952. The Battalion fought on "The Hook" and Hill 355 "Little Gibraltar" until ceasefire was read 27 July 1953. The Battalion then moved to Naenjong in the Demilitarized Zone and manned check points there until relieved by the Black Watch in October 1953. The 3rd Battalion was reduced to nil strength on January 8, 1954. It was reformed in April 1970 supplemented by members of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, many of whom rebadged with the Princess Patricia's after their regiment was reduced to one reserve battalion. The 3rd Battalion was presented Colours on 20 November 1971 by the Governor General of Canada and new Colours on March 9, 1993 by the Colonel-In-Chief, the Countess Mountbatten of Burma. The new Colours were presented in Pacrac, Croatia, the first time that a Canadian Unit was presented with consecrated Colours in an operational theatre during hostilities. The 3rd Battalion was stationed at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, British Columbia until 1994 when it moved to Chilliwack, British Columbia, then Griesbach Barracks, Edmonton and then finally to Edmonton Garrison (Namao) in 1997. It served 6 month Peacekeeping tours in Cyprus in 1970-1971, 1975-1976, 1980 and 1988 and in Croatia in 1992-1993. As part of NATO, A and B Companies served in Bosnia between January 1997 and January 1998 and on the United Nations Security Force (SFOR) between February and September 2000. As part of the Afghanistan War, members of the 3rd Battalion served in battle groups in Kandahar and Helmand provinces and in the city of Kabul from 2002 until 2014.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1917-

During the First World War veterans of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) in Ottawa began to gather informally. The Patricia Club of Ottawa was formed 27 December 1917. Other Patricia Clubs were later formed in some of the larger Canadian cities. These clubs provided personal assistance to veterans and their families as well as other public services. Following the Second World War, on 18 May 1946, Hamilton Gault organized the first meeting of the PPCLI Association. On 13 September 1953, the PPCLI Association was incorporated. It was structured with autonomous Branches in Canadian cities or regions, and one Branch in the United Kingdom. From 1953 to 1994, the Association ran the PPCLI Regimental Museum and Archives. In 1964 the Association established the Hamilton Gault Memorial Fund for charitable purposes. From about 1982 to about 1994 the Regimental Adjutant was also Secretary-Treasurer of the Association. As of 2017, there were 10 Branches of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association across Canada.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association. Manitoba and Northwest Ontario Branch

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1953-

During World War I Patricia veterans in Ottawa began to gather informally, and the Patricia Club of Ottawa was formed 27 December 1917. On 7 February 1918 its constitution was adopted. Other clubs were later formed in some of the larger Canadian cities, including Winnipeg, which was the Home Base of the the Regiment during the inter-war years. These clubs provided personal assistance to veterans and their families as well as other public services. Following the Second World War, on 18 May 1946, Hamilton Gault organized the first meeting of the PPCLI Association which now included soldiers still serving with the Regiment. After the Korean War, on 13 September 1953, the PPCLI Association was incorporated and the Winnipeg Branch was one of its affiliates. According to the 1985 constitution of the Association, the Winnipeg Branch was renamed the Manitoba Branch. According to the 1990 constitution, it was renamed the Manitoba/NW Ontario Branch. According to its newsletter banner, it was styled Manitoba and North Western Ontario Branch (1999-2002) and Manitoba and Northwest Ontario Branch (2005-2011).

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association. Okanagan/Thompson Branch

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

During World War I Patricia veterans in Ottawa began to gather informally. The Patricia Club of Ottawa was formed 27 December 1917. On 7 February 1918 its constitution was adopted, and other Patricia Clubs were formed in some of the larger Canadian cities. These clubs provided personal assistance to veterans and their families as well as other public services. Following the Second World War, on 18 May 1946, Hamilton Gault organized the first meeting of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association which now included soldiers still serving with the Regiment. After the Korean War, on 13 September 1953, the PPCLI Association was incorporated. Branches of the Association exit across Canada and in Great Britain, each with their own executive overseen by the National Executive. The Okanagan/Thompson Branch, centred in Vernon, BC, was founded and organized in 1984 by LCol Vince Lilley. It serves members located in the Okanagan Valley and the Thompson River watershed in British Columbia.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association. Vancouver Island Branch

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-

A group of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) veterans living in Victoria, BC was represented at the inaugural meeting of the PPCLI Association in October 1947. The Victoria Branch was one of the components of the Association when it was legally incorporated in 1953. It was renamed Vancouver Island Branch in 2004.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Band

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1994

Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry had two bands during the First World War. The Edmonton Pipe Band joined as a unit in August 1914. Pipers played men over the top and then followed as stretcher-bearers. The core of the PPCLI Brass and Reed Band was formed when eligible members of The St. Mary’s Boys Brigade Band joined the 140th New Brunswick Battalion in January 1916. When the 140th was broken up in November 1917, the entire Band joined the PPCLI in the field. Bandmaster (Lance Sergeant) Charles H. Williams was wounded in the front lines near Tilloy, France 28 September 1918 and later died. His brother, Sergeant Harold H. (Pete) Williams took over as Bandmaster for the duration of the war. Both bands provided music during route marches, burials and rest periods. The PPCLI Band performed one of its last official duties on 27 February 1919 when they played at Princess Patricia’s wedding. When the Permanent Force was established in 1919, the PPCLI Military Band was reformed. Under the guidance of Captain Tommy James, it was stationed at Fort Osborne Barracks in Winnipeg during the 1920s and 30s. It played as many as 50 free concerts a year and was broadcast across Canada. In ca.1935 the PPCLI Bugle Band was formed and then a Dance Band was formed ca.1937. When Captain James retired in 1939, Warrant Officer Al Streeter took over as Director of Music. After the outbreak of Second World War, 15 younger members of the PPCLI Military Band volunteered for active duty and it was disbanded late in 1939. Warrant Officer Streeter arrived in England in 1941 to lead the 1st Canadian Divisional Band, which was largely made up of former PPCLI Bandsmen. The PPCLI Band was reactivated after the war and was established at Wainwright, Alberta. Enlistment was slow and recruitment took place in England and Holland. In 1951, the Band numbered 20 members, but by late 1953 it reached its authorized strength of 55 musicians. It performed in marching formation for ceremonies, and also as a stage band. it recorded a number of commercial albums. Due to budget cuts in 1994, the Concert Band was officially disbanded and reduced to a Corps of Drums.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Heritage Committee

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1992-2009

The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Heritage Committee was formed and met for the first time on 14 March 1992. The founding president was Colonel (Ret'd) W. B. S. Sutherland. Major (Ret'd) Rod Middleton later served in the leadership role. The Committee was composed of serving and retired members of the Regiment, and reported to the Regimental Executive Committee. The original role of the Committee was to contribute to the monitoring, recording, preserving and enhancement of the heritage of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, primarily through the planning and undertaking of new initiatives and works in keeping with the stated goals and objectives of the Regiment. In conjunction with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Museum Committee, and within the corporate identity of the Regiment, a primary objective of the Committee was to facilitate the assembly of a high quality historically balanced collection of materials representing the Regiment's achievements in preparation for the 100th Anniversary of the Regiment in 2014. The scope of activities included: preparing and maintaining a long-term written Heritage Preservation Plan; cataloguing and monitoring the condition of and ensuring the preservation of Regimental monuments and memorials not assigned to other units; planning, recommending and facilitating the execution of new works of art; investigating and recommending other means of collecting; and preserving and making available to the Regiment and to the public the heritage of the Regiment and developing and maintaining an adequate written set of operating procedures to govern the efficient and ethical functioning of the Committee as a representative body of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. The most significant achievement of the Committee was the research, creation, and publication of a book on the Regiment's history. In 1998 questionnaires were sent out to retired and serving members of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry asking for anecdotes and archival material detailing their service with the Regiment. Those surveyed were also asked if they would be willing to be interviewed as part of a new Regimental history book project. Volunteers were trained in interviewing skills and interviews took place across Canada. The book "The Patricias: the Proud History of a Fighting Regiment" by Dr. David Bercuson was published in 2001. Following the publication, the Committee became somewhat dormant. By 2009 it had become a subcommittee of the Regiment's 100th Anniversary Committee.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Home Station Officers' Mess

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-

In Canadian military tradition, officers normally dine separately from non-commissioned officers and junior ranks. The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) Officers' Mess came into being in 1914 shortly after the founding of the Regiment. An Officers' Mess could be established in any location where there were a significant number of officers. The PPCLI Home Station Officers' Mess was located at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Calgary from 1968 until 1997 when the PPCLI Home Station was moved to CFB Edmonton. Under the authority of the Queen's (or King's) Regulations and Orders, it governs itself under a Constitution and Bylaws. In addition to maintaining facilities for dining, it provides social and recreational services to its members and their families.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Home Station Warrant Officers' and Sergeants' Mess

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-

In Canadian military tradition, senior non-commissioned officers (sergeants and warrant officers) normally dine separately from officers and from junior ranks (privates and corporals). The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) Sergeant's Mess was established in 1914 shortly after the founding of the Regiment. By the 1970s it was known as the Home Station Warrant Officers' and Sergeants Mess. The Home Station of the PPCLI was considered to be Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Calgary from 1968 until 1997 when it was moved to CFB Edmonton. Under the authority of the Queen's (or King's) Regulations and Orders, it governs itself under a Constitution and Bylaws. In addition to dining, the Mess provides social and recreational services to its members and their families.

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