Showing 511 results

Authority record

Rosser, David Hillard

  • ppcli
  • Person
  • [ca. 1906]-1980

David Hillard Rosser, ca. 1906-1980, was born in Wales and was commissioned an officer of the Royal Welch Guards in 1926. He emigrated to Montreal, Quebec in 1929. He joined Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry as a Lieutenant on 22 November 1939. He rose rapidly up the ranks, and left PPCLI in October 1941 to fill various staff positions in England. He rejoined PPCLI on 6 May 1944, as a Major, second-in-command to Lt.Col. Cameron Ware. On 28 June 1944 he was appointed Commanding Officer of PPCLI. On 16 September 1944 he was wounded when a German shell hit his tactical headquarters near the Rimini Line. He was struck off strength but returned to General Staff until 1946. He was appointed to the Order of the British Empire. After the war he worked as a civil servant in England and Wales. In 1947 he married Mary Cecilia Cozens-Hardy. He died at Crawley, Sussex, England in March 1980.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) was raised in Ottawa in August 1914 as the result of an offer by Captain A. Hamilton Gault to provide $100,000.00 to finance and equip a regiment for overseas service. It was named after Princess Patricia, granddaughter of Queen Victoria and daughter of the Duke of Connaught, then Governor-General of Canada. PPCLI has been a Canadian permanent force regiment since its founding. Since 1920 it has been based in various locations in western Canada. It participated in two World Wars, the Korean War, the War in Afghanistan, civic crises, Cold War era defence and numerous peacekeeping missions all over the world. During the Korean War the Regiment was increased to 3 Battalions and then cut back to 2 Battalions in 1954. In 1970 it was again increased to 3 Battalions. In the 1990s the three Battalions were based in Edmonton, Alberta and CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Kit Shop

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • [ca. 1960]-2015

The Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Kit Shop (or Kitshop) has operated since at least the 1960s. It is a retail business operating under the management of PPCLI Regimental Headquarters. It sells clothing and equipment required by soldiers but not officially issued, such as athletic wear, knives, boots, and camping supplies. It also sells souvenir items such as jewelry, baseball caps, and water bottles.

Carvell, George Cecil

  • ppcli
  • Person
  • 1882-1923

George Cecil Carvell, was born in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on July 20, 1882. He later lived in Toronto and Montreal, and was a merchant, according to his attestation papers. He joined Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) on August 24, 1914, and held regimental number 136. He was soon promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant, then to lieutenant, as Transport Officer, then to captain as Acting Adjutant. In February 1917 he was seconded to supervise the Chinese Labour Corps. He was struck off strength on April 16, 1918, and served with the Intelligence Branch of the British government with the rank of Major in Tientsin, China. He returned to Canada in 1923 and died in Vancouver, BC on December 16, 1925. On August 15, 1916 he married Ruby Eleanor Coates, and they had one daughter, Eleanor Katherine, born October 14, 1917.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Band

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1919-1994

The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry had two bands in WWI. The Edmonton Pipe Band joined as a unit in August 1914. Pipers played men over the top and then followed as stretcher-bearers. The core of the PPCLI Brass and Reed Band was formed when eligible members of The St. Mary’s Boys Brigade Band joined the 140th New Brunswick Battalion in January 1916. When the 140th was broken up in November 1917, the entire Band joined the PPCLI in the field. Bandmaster (Lance Sergeant) Charles H. Williams was wounded in the front lines near Tilloy, France 28 September 1918 and later died. His brother, Sergeant Harold H. (Pete) Williams took over as Bandmaster for the duration of the war. Both bands provided music during route marches, burials and rest periods. The PPCLI Band performed one of its last official duties on 27 February 1919 when they played at Princess Patricia’s wedding. When the Permanent Force was established in 1919, the PPCLI Military Band was reformed. Under the guidance of Captain Tommy James, it was stationed at Fort Osborne Barracks in Winnipeg during the 1920s and 30s. It played as many as 50 free concerts a year and was broadcast across Canada. In ca.1935 the PPCLI Bugle Band was formed and then a Dance Band was formed ca.1937. When Captain James retired in 1939, Warrant Officer I Al Streeter took over as Director of Music. After the outbreak of Second World War, 15 younger members of the PPCLI Military Band volunteered for active duty and it was disbanded late in 1939. Warrant Officer Streeter arrived in England in 1941 to lead the 1st Canadian Divisional Band, which was largely made up of former PPCLI Bandsmen. The PPCLI Band was reactivated after the war and was established at Wainwright, Alberta. Enlistment was slow and recruitment took place in England and Holland. Iin 1951, the Band numbered 20 members, but by late 1953 it reached its authorized strength of 55 musicians. It performed in marching formation for ceremonies, and also as a stage band. it recorded a number of commercial albums. Due to budget cuts in 1994, the Concert Band was officially disbanded and reduced to a Corps of Drums.

Watson, Brent

  • ppcli
  • Person
  • fl. 1951

Brent Wilson was the author of an article, "Recipe for victory : the fight for Hill 677 during the Battle of the Kap'yong River, 24-25 April 1951".

Torpe, Norman

  • ppcli
  • Person
  • 1919-2000

Norman David Torpe, 1919-2000, was one of the original 250 Canadian volunteers selected for the First Special Service Force, a joint American-Canadian unit known as the "Devil's Brigade". Only 72 of the 250 passed the initial exams and only 18 completed training. He deployed with the Force to the Aleutian Islands in early 1943 and to Italy in November 1943. He was wounded at the Anzio bridgehead in the spring of 1944 and lost one eye which ended his military career. Following the war Norman was a forest ranger and then farmed in Clive, Tofield, and Daysland, Alberta. He marred Violet Haroldson. He passed away in Camrose, Alberta on 2 March 2000.

Operation Deliverance

  • ppcli
  • Corporate body
  • 1992-1993

The Canadian Airborne Regiment was established in 1968. It was organized into units of paratroopers from the three Canadian permanent infantry regiments. 2 Commando (2 Cdo) consisted mostly of members of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). On 4 September, 1992 the Canadian Airborne was tasked with participating in a peacekeeping and humanitarian effort known as Operation Deliverance in Somalia, which was suffering from a famine as well as a civil war leading to the breakdown of all political authority. 2 Commando was assigned to take a vanguard role in the Canadian Airborne Regiment Brigade Group. In December 1992 the Brigade Group arrived in Somalia, and was tasked with securing the airfield, and restoring civil order in the town of Belet Uen. It did succeed in securing the airfield, providing security and coordination for non-government organization humanitarian efforts, re-establishing the local police force, and convening meetings of tribal leaders with the objective of re-establishing a local civilian government. These achievements were overshadowed in the Canadian public view by an unfortunate incident. One of the problems the Brigade Group encountered was the theft of their supplies by youths from the town. On 16 March, 1993, one such youth, Shidane Arone, was arrested, tortured, and killed by a security patrol. The Canadian Airborne returned to Canada by 26 July, 1993. Two of Arone's captors and their immediate commanding officer were court-martialled and sentenced to prison terms and dismissal from the Canadian Armed Forces in March-April 1994. Media reports suggested that 2 Commando was permeated with members of racist organizations. The Canadian Airborne Regiment was disbanded on 1 September 1995. 2 Commando was re-integrated into the PPCLI as the Princess Patricia's Parachute Company in a ceremony on 25 September 1995.

Results 21 to 30 of 511