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Stangowitz, Al

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1931-2012

Born 13 February 1931 at Macklin, Saskatchewan, John "Al" Stangowitz worked as an apprentice welder in Edmonton before joining the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) in February 1948. He completed Recruit Basic Training at Camp Borden in Ontario and was posted to B Company, 1st Battalion, PPCLI at Currie Barracks in Calgary, Alberta in May 1948. He was trained as a bren gunner and then sent to Rivers, Manitoba where he completed his jump course (parachute training) in May 1950. Private Stangowitz was reposted to the 1st Battalion in 1950 and then returned to Camp Borden where he completed the Driver Operator and Signals course. When he returned to the Battalion in July 1950, he was employed as a Signaller and passed the Air-Portability course in August. Stangowitz then was sent to Wainwright, Alberta to help train the Second Battalion, Signals for service in Korea. He was sent to Korea, arriving in September 1951, and was attached to B Company, 2nd Battalion, PPCLI. Al was wounded by a shell fragment to the head in April 1951 and evacuated to Japan where he spent three months recovering. He was then transferred to Movement Control at Iwakuni, Japan where he was employed loading priority supplies onto aircraft. When the 2nd Battalion was relieved by the 1st in October 1951, Private Stangowitz returned to Canada and applied for discharge in November. Following the War he worked as a carpenter for forty years. He was active in the PPCLI Association, the Korea Veterans Association and the Royal Canadian Legion, and volunteered at the PPCLI Regimental Museum. He was married to Dorothy Stangowitz (d. 2006) and to Doris Stangowitz. He had four children, James, Gordon, Brenda, and Douglas. He died in Calgary on 13 September 2012.

Petrie, Charles A.

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1925-

Born 22 April 1925 in Edmonton Alberta, TM12658 Charles Petrie enrolled in the Canadian Army as a private 7 June 1944. He was selected for Airborne training but was remustered to the General Reinforcement corps in November 1944. After further training in England he qualified as an Infantry Signaller and was transferred to the Calgary Highlanders at Rodenkirchen, Germany in May 1945 as a clerk of Headquarters Battalion in the Occupation Force. By the end of June 1945 Private Petrie was back in England and returned to Canada shortly thereafter. He was released from the Canadian Army 2 October 1945 and returned to the University of Alberta in Edmonton. After graduating with a BSc in 1948 he worked as a calculator on seismic surveys and then as an oilfield chemist. He enrolled as an officer candidate with the Loyal Edmonton Regiment and was commissioned 1 January 1950. He then enlisted with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 23 October 1950 and was posted to 2nd Battalion at Camp Wainwright, eventually becoming assigned to the 3rd Battalion, C Company, 9 Platoon 30 November 1950. In March 1951 he was transferred back to the 2nd Battalion and was assigned to 5 Platoon on the eve of the Battle of KapYong, 24 April 1951. In June he served as the Quartermaster and then as Platoon Commander 8 Platoon, C Company until the Second Battalion was relieved by the First Battalion in November 1951. He remained in Korea as Admin Logistics Officer until December 1951. Returning to Canada, he served with the 2nd Battalion as Intelligence Officer, Assistant Adjutant and Platoon Commander both in Canada and Germany until December 1956. He then spent 5 years at Headquarters, Saskatchewan Area where he was promoted to Captain and then assigned to Tactical Headquarters in Newfoundland from 1961 to 1963. From 1963 until his release from the military 24 July 1970 Captain Petrie held several staff appointments in Ottawa. Following his military service he returned to university and eventually became a teacher and silversmith. He was living in Victoria, BC in the 1990s and in England in 2014. «

Candy, Gilbert

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1889-1983

1541 Gilbert W. Candy was born 30 August 1889 in Buenos Aires, Argentina and saw service with the 15th Light Horse in England prior to immigrating to Canada in 1911. He worked on a dairy farm near Black Diamond, Alberta. He enlisted with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry as one of the "originals" on 12 August 1914. Promoted to Lance Corporal 9 October 1915 he was wounded 2 June 1916 at the Battle of Mount Sorrel while acting as a grenade thrower. He was subsequently Struck Off Strength 9 June 1916. He was Mentioned in Dispatches for his actions at Sanctuary Wood. Candy was promoted to Acting Sergeant and remained in England for 3 months as an instructor in Mills Bombs. He returned to Canada 14 October 1916 with other invalid soldiers. After undergoing some treatment for flat feet he was discharged as medically unfit 18 January 1917. He returned to England in 1917 and was involved in a family business exporting pedigreed bulls and rams to Argentina. He emigrated to New Zealand in 1925 and operated a dairy business near Auckland. He married Esther Pike, and they had four children, Field, Robin, Nielson, and Patricia. He passed away in New Zealand in 1983 at the age of 94.

Chatry, Harry

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1926-2018

Harry Stephen Chatry was born 2 April 1926 in Delisle, Saskatchewan. He joined the Canadian Army 12 April 1945 and was posted to Vernon, British Columbia to become part of the Pacific force. The Second World War ended before he was posted overseas and he elected to remain in the Permanent Force. He was badged to the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Shilo, Manitoba in January 1946 and was promoted to Corporal in 1947. He was posted to Currie Barracks in Calgary in 1947 and made Company Orderly Sergeant. When the Regiment went Airborne in 1948, Corporal Chatry was chosen for Glider pilot training and was sent to the Royal Canadian Air Force School of Aviation Medicine in Toronto and then to Rivers, Manitoba for flight training. He graduated from the #1 Glider Pilot's Course in 1949 and returned to Rivers to join Glider Flight and instruct other pilots. Promoted to Sergeant in the early 50s, he closed Glider Flight in 1955 and returned to Calgary where he was appointed Acting Company Quartermaster of A Company, Second Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. Promoted to Staff Sergeant in 1956 Chatry was posted to Camp Borden as Small Arms Instructor. Posted back to the Second Battalion in 1964 he joined Reconnaissance Platoon and after a jump injury was attached to the Loyal Edmonton Regiment for almost a year. Returning to the Regiment in 1965 Warrant Officer Chatry was posted to the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade in Germany as Brigade Sergeant Major. Later that same year he was transferred to the First Battalion and posted to Hemer, Germany where he was in charge of C Company and then Headquarters Company. When the First Battalion rotated back to Canada, Warrant Officer Chatry stayed in Germany with the Second Battalion, later returning to the First Battalion now stationed at Currie Barracks, Calgary, Alberta in 1968. After working at Regimental Headquarters for a year, Harry Chatry retired from the military in 1969 and settled in Sardis, BC. He was married to Hope Chatry, and they operated several businesses in the Chilliwack/Sardis area. They had three children, Gordon, Leslie, and Sharron. Harry Chatry died 23 April, 2018.

Popkie, Howard James

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1934-

SA 1751 Howard James Popkie was born 29 September 1934 at Horton Township, Ontario. He was a member of the Oxford Rifles (militia) from 1950-1951 and joined the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in 1951 at the age of 16. He joined the Third Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 9 July 1951 and trained at Wainwright, Alberta, Camp Borden, Ontario, and Camp Ipperwash, Ontario prior to going overseas with the Battalion in October 1952. Private Popkie was a member of the Vickers Machine Gun Platoon and served in Korea from November 1952 to October 1953. He was honorably released 7 July 1954 but rejoined the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry with the Second Battalion 26 June 1957. He was posted first to Griesbach Barracks in Edmonton, Alberta and then to Esquimalt, British Columbia. He was honorably discharged 3 July 1960 and returned to Ontario. He was living at Arnprior, Ontario in 2015.

Gray, Hub

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • 1928-2018

Hubert Archibald "Hub" Gray, 1928-2018, joined the Canadian Scottish Regiment in 1948. In October 1950 he volunteered for service in the Korean War, and transferred as a Lieutenant to the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (2PPCLI). In February 1951 he arrived in Korea as second-in-command of the Mortar Platoon. He was said to have acted coolly and decisively during the Battle of KapYong, Korea, 24-25 April 1951. He was later appointed Commander of 12 Platoon, D Company in charge of a machine gun section. Promoted to Captain following his return to Canada in November 1951, he realized his goal of becoming a paratrooper in 1952. He resigned from the Permanent Force in 1953, but continued to serve in the Militia, with the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada and the 48th Highlanders, until 1958. In civilian life, he became a partner in Richardson Securities, specializing in petroleum investments. He was active in veterans' organizations and in the PPCLI Heritage Committee. He was the author of: Beyond the danger close : the Korean experience revealed : 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. - Calgary : Bunker to Bunker Pub., 2003. In 1953 he married Pam Cowie, and they had four sons, Char, Chris, Randy, and Tim.

Reid, James Malcolm

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • d. 2004

H16730 James Malcolm "Jim" Reid was born in Selkirk, Manitoba and served in the 31st U.S. Infantry Regiment in the Philippine Islands. In December 1939 he enlisted in the Winnipeg Light Infantry, transferring to the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry on 12 January 1940 and joining the Regiment at Godstone, Surrey 11 April 1941. He remained with the unit until December 1942. Returning to Canada on the SS Queen Elizabeth for a three month instructors' course at the Officer's Training Centre (OTC), Brockville Ontario, Jim transferred to the OTC, Three Rivers Quebec until September 1943 when he was posted to the Instructional Cadre in Aldershot, Hants. Shortly thereafter Jim reverted to the rank of Private (later promoted to Lance Corporal) to rejoin the Regiment. Wounded on 23 May 1944 at the Hitler Line near Monte Casino he was hospitalized in Casserta, Italy then transferred to Kingston Military Hospital and eventually to Christie Street hospital where he was found by Hookie Walker and others of the Patricia Club in August 1944. After attending the University of Toronto Contingent Canadian OTC, James Reid was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the Supply Reserve 1 October 1950 and then posted to the Canadian Army Special Force raised for service in the Korean War. Promoted to Acting Captain he transferred to the First Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry 3 September 1957 and then to the Second Battalion as a Captain in November the same year. Jim joined the Toronto Branch of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association in 1947 when they were meeting at the Sir Arthur Currie Memorial Hall on Isabella Street. Jim has seen service with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Association, Toronto Branch as Secretary, Treasurer in 1972 and President in 2000. He died on 20 January 2004 in Toronto.

Jackson, John A.

  • ppcli
  • Persoon
  • fl. 1935-2001

P22230 John A. Jackson joined the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry as part of the Regimental Band ca. 1935. He enlisted for overseas service 1 September 1939 but was Struck Off Strength 26 January 1941 and returned to Canada for further training at Camp Borden. He was a part of the #2 Provost Company Draft in 1943. In 2001 he was living in Edmonton, Alberta.

Canadian Siberian Expeditionary Force. 260th Battalion

  • ppcli
  • Instelling
  • 1918-1919

The 260th Battalion was one of two Infantry Battalions within the 16th Canadian Infantry Brigade, Canadian Siberian Expeditionary Force (C.S.E.F.), formed by Order of Council 12 August 1918. They were part of an Allied Force of more than 120,000 men commanded by General Kikuzo Otani of Japan. The Allied Force was originally united to protect Allied war materials stockpiled in Russia and to reopen the Eastern Front. This priority later changed to that of rescuing the Czechoslovakian Legion, which was stranded in Siberia by the aftermath of the Russian Revolution. The Russian Revolution of 1917 necessitated the withdrawal of the Tsar's Army from the Eastern Front. This increased pressure on the already exhausted Allies in the West and put military stores at Archangel in the North and Vladivostok in the South at risk. The Czech Brigade, formed by patriotic deserters from the Austro-Hungarian Army, was no longer able to fight from Russian soil. Following the signing of the Brest- Livotsk Treaty between the Bolsheviks and the Central Powers in March 1918, the Czech Legion, now 60,000 strong and composed of pardoned POWs, displaced Serbs, Italians, Rumanians and Poles, found themselves essentially behind enemy lines. With the Provisional Government's blessing, the Legion's initial aim was to cross Siberia by rail to Vladivostok where they would sail to North America and then to France to resume the fight for an independent homeland. Following an incident involving the Czechs and repatriated Hungarian prisoners, the Bolsheviks decreed that any armed Legionnaire found along the railway would be shot on the spot. The Legion was reluctantly drawn into the Russian Civil War and forced to side with the "White" Russians. By late summer 1918 they controlled the Trans-Siberian Railway from Omsk to Vladivostok. This prompted the Allies to consider a possible Bolshevik defeat. The Canadian Government, hoping to establish favorable post-war trading opportunities with the Far East, agreed to be part of a "Mixed Brigade" to support the "White" Russians. This was the first independent military expedition that Canada was to undertake. The Armistice of 11 November 1918 clouded the issues. The Canadian people were reluctant to become involved in further offensive operations, especially in the East. This meant that the C.S.E.F. would serve only as a "stabilizing element". The 260th Battalion was composed of 42 Officers and 984 Other Ranks, 520 of which were drafted under the Military Service Act of 1917. Under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Jamieson of Edmonton, the Battalion trained at Willows Camp in Victoria from October through December 1918. The Spanish flu epidemic of 1918/19 landed 180 men in hospital and delayed departure. The Battalion finally embarked on the SS Protesliaus at Gordon Head on 26 December 1918, arriving in Vladivostok 15 January 1919. The Battalion was stationed at Gournestai Barracks (10 miles east of Vladivostok), with guards posted at East and Second River Barracks. During the 14 weeks in theatre no shots were fired in anger and, except for small parties of railway guards, the Battalion never moved east. A month after the arrival of the C.S.E.F., plans were underway to bring them home. Many of the men of the 260th were among the first to leave, departing Vladivostok on the SS Monteagle 22 April 1919. When they arrived in Vancouver on the 22nd of June, the wharf that 6 months ago was packed with a cheering populace was now deserted. In 1997 the PPCLI agreed to perpetuate the 260th Battalion and become the official "safekeeper" of the Battalion's heritage. Perpetuation is a uniquely Canadian system that insures, when possible, the deeds and sacrifices of disbanded combat units that have gained an honour or distinction in the field are remembered. The PPCLI will now carry the Battle Honour "Siberia 1918-1919".

Kedey (family)

  • ppcli
  • Familie
  • 1890-

411017 William Moses Kedey was born at Fitzroy Harbour, Ontario, 4 October 1890. He enlisted with the First University Company, 17 March 1915 and joined the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in the field 28 July 1915. He died 3 September 1916 in the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary of wounds received at Mount Sorrel 16 July 1916. Papers discovered upon his death revealed that Private Kedey was a Mason and this was brought to the attention of the Duke of Derbyshire, Provincial Grand Master, who had also been appointed Governor General of Canada in August 1916. The Duke arranged for a funeral service to be held in Derby and William Kedey was buried with full military and masonic honours in Nottingham Cemetery, Derbyshire. Photographs and newsclippings of Kedey's funeral came into the possession of his nephew, Arthur Piggott of Ottawa. Arthur's wife, businesswoman and politician Jean Piggott, was chair of the National Capital Commission in the 1990s.

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