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Archival description
Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Collection Military
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Between the wars photo collection

  • PPCLI P50
  • Collection
  • 1919-1939

This collection consists of photographs of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) activities from its reorganization as a permanent peacetime battalion in March 1919 until its departure for Europe on December 17, 1939.

First World War photo collection

  • PPCLI P30
  • Collection
  • 1912 - 1919

This collection consists of photographs of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) activities from the formation of the Regiment on 11 August 1914 to its demobilization from wartime service on 20 March 1919. Includes group portraits, and photos of unidentified individuals.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives

Frezenberg research collection

  • PPCLI Collection 134
  • Collection
  • [Photocopied ca. 2000-ca. 2014 (originally created 1915-1995)]

The collection consists of photocopies of maps and descriptions of the Battle of Frezenberg, a part of the 2nd Battle of Ypres, in which PPCLI suffered many casualties. Includes extracts from the PPCLI war diary, and from published books by Jeffery Williams, Ralph Hodder-Williams, and Sir Max Aitken.

Friendly fire incident (2002) collection

  • PPCLI Collection 93
  • Collection
  • 2002 - 2005

The Tarnak Farm incident, more familiarly known in Canada as "the friendly fire incident", occurred on April 17, 2002 near Kandahar, Afghanistan during Operation Apollo. The 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Battle Group (3PPCLIBG) was conducting night-time anti-tank and machine gun firing exercises, which were mistaken for enemy fire by U.S. Air National Guard fighter jet pilots. The pilots attacked, killing Canadian soldiers Marc Leger, Ainsworth Dyer, Richard Green, and Nathan Smith, and injuring at least eight others. They were the first Canadian casualties of the Afghanistan War, and the incident generated a massive public response. The collection consists of news clippings; printouts of online news stories; TV news clips; scrapbooks of news clippings; messages of condolence received by PPCLI in the form of email messages, condolence books, letters, and sympathy cards; eulogies of the deceased soldiers; and the contents of an album of photographs and memorabilia from Marley Leger's visit to Bosnia.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

Individual Files photograph collection

  • PPCLI P400
  • Collection
  • ca. 1910-ca. 2000

The collection consists of formal and informal portraits of individual members of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, filed alphabetically by surname.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives

Korean War research collection

  • PPCLI Collection 135
  • Collection
  • 1951, [ca.1995-ca. 2006]

The collection consists mostly of articles found online. Includes "Korea Vet News" including stories about Roy Rushton, Rod Middleton, and Mike Levy (2006). Includes articles produced for CBC series "The Forgotten War" (1999). Includes articles "Korean War : weapons (1999-2001). Includes a chronology of the war, an analysis by Harry G. Summers Jr., and an article from American Military History. Includes articles by embedded journalist Pierre Berton (1951) including a profile of L/Cpl Karry (Kerry) Dunphy.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives

PPCLI Battle School photo collection

  • PPCLI P170
  • Collection
  • [ca. 1953]-1985

The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) Depot was established at Calgary in 1953 for the purpose of training soldiers of the 1st and 2nd Battalions, and overseeing administrative functions for the Regiment as a whole. In 1956 it moved to Edmonton. In 1968 with the reorganization of the Canadian Armed Forces the Depot was abolished, and recruit training was centralized at CFB Wainwright. In 1974 the recruit training function became the responsibility of the 1st Canadian Mechanized Brigade Training Detachment. In 1981 it was renamed the PPCLI Battle School. In 1997 it was renamed the Western Area Training Centre. This collection consists of photographs of the PPCLI Depot and PPCLI Battle School, as well as Canadian Forces Recruit School (CFRS) at CFB Cornwallis and Combat Training Centre (CTC) at CFB Gagetown.

PPCLI Colonels of the Regiment photo collection

  • PPCLI P12
  • Collection
  • 1941-2015

The honorary title of Colonel of the Regiment (CoR) of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) was initiated by the Regimental Executive Committee (REC) in October 1958, with permission of Army Headquarters. The title was limited to serving or retired officers of PPCLI holding the rank of Colonel or higher. The CoR participated in parades and other ceremonies, and was an ex officio member of the REC. The founder of the Regiment, Brigadier-General A. Hamilton Gault, was the first to hold the title, however, he died in the same month as his appointment, November 1958. He was succeeded by Major-General Cameron Bethel Ware, who held the title from 1959 to 1977. Thereafter, Colonels of the Regiment were appointed for 3-year terms, which could be renewed once. The collection consists of formal portraits of Colonels of the Regiment, and photos of them in ceremonial and other situations. The photos are grouped into series by their names in consecutive order: Cameron Bethel Ware, George Grenville Brown, William Benjamin Scott Sutherland, Reginald Stuart Graham, Herbert Chesley Pitts, C. William Hewson, A.J.G.D. de Chastelain, Robert I. Stewart, J.E.L. Gollner, Raymond R. Crabbe, W. Brian Vernon, Vincent W. Kennedy. Includes Col. Sutherland's collection of historical photos.

PPCLI Colours photo collection.

  • PPCLI P14
  • Collection
  • 1914 - 1989

This collection consists of images of the Colours of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) as well as related units such as 2 Commando of the Canadian Airborne Regiment. Also includes images of the PPCLI camp flag. In early military tradition, a battalion’s Colours were a flag carried near the commanding officer to serve as a rallying point in the melee of battle. Though no longer of strategic importance, its Colours are considered to be its most precious possession and are normally only displayed during military parades. In the British Commonwealth, battalions possess two Colours: the King’s (or Queen’s) Colour and the Regimental Colour. Regiments can be given permission to decorate their Colours with Battle Honours: the names of notable battles or campaigns in which they fought. PPCLI’s original Colour, known as the Ric-A-Dam-Doo, was hand-embroidered by Princess Patricia, and was last Canadian Colour to actually be carried into battle.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives

PPCLI Korean War (general) photo collection

  • PPCLI P100
  • Collection
  • 1916-1999 (predominant 1950-1953)

This collection consists of images of Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) during the Korean War which have not been associated with any of the three battalions of the Regiment.

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

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